The Worst Drivers in the World by Country

Every year, there are roughly 1.3 million deaths that occur due to road traffic injuries. This outlines one thing: road safety is an important aspect, and it shouldn’t be overlooked. In spite of this, it would seem that driving under the influence is a significant contributing factor when it comes to accidental road deaths. For example, in South Africa, no less than 58 percent of the road accidents happen due to alcohol consumption, being followed by Canada at 34 percent and the United States at 31 percent.

However, accidents aren’t the only problem here: the way in which some drivers behave matters just as much. That being said, let’s have a look at the countries with the worst drivers, shall we?

Chad

This is a relatively small African country, with a population of over 11 million people that speak Arabic, French, and other languages. At the same time, more than 50 percent out of the total population is under 14-years old – this could be one of the reasons why the accident rate is high, in most cases resulting in mortalities. In addition, the condition of the infrastructure is poor, which definitely plays a role. Due to desert dust, the fatality rate reaches 29.7.

Iraq

Moving on, Iraq has become synonymous with permanent turmoil – especially during the last couple of years. Unfortunately, drivers seem to be careless regarding road safety as well – which is why Iraq is notorious with a high death rate due to road crashes. Presumably, we could argue that the political instability plays a part.

Nigeria

Nigeria is one of the most populated nations in Africa, embodying over 250 distinct ethnicities. Only 6.1 percent of the population is over 55 years old, whereas the life expectancy is quite low – 52 years old. Nonetheless, it would appear that road accidents aren’t the only ones to blame. High mortality rate and AIDS, among other things, cause premature death. Due to the piracy that takes place at Nigerian borders, this isn’t the place where you can feel safe.

Iran

The median age in Iran is of 28 years, only 10 percent of the population being older than 55. This outlines that there could be a link between fatal road accidents and age. Even so, age isn’t the only contributing factor. The fact that the road conditions are at a crisis level definitely counts. A shocking fact is that there aren’t any child restraint laws in this country, regardless of the high rate of mortality.

Democratic Republic of Congo

Many of the roads in the Democratic Republic of Congo are simply dirt roads that are easily exposed to destruction due to unfavorable weather conditions and other factors. Therefore, it is quite common to encounter large potholes or large pits of mud – which is what gets many vehicles stuck. This certainly causes a lot of frustration, which is what makes driving quite unsafe.

Dominican Republic

In lines with official sources, the people in the Dominican Republic rarely follow any road rules. As a matter of fact, a red light is perceived as a yield sign. What is more, there are many dangerous practices engaged by numerous drivers, which significantly increases the number of fatal road accidents – specifically with a side impact. On a different note, drivers also have the habit of utilizing their horns more than their brakes.

Thailand

Road safety standards in Thailand are hardly there, as road rules are badly enforced. Thailand is actually notorious for its poor history concerning road accidents and their prevalence. Because of this, if you’re planning to visit Thailand, you should avoid attempting to drive there.

Venezuela

Venezuela – similar to many tropical countries, it is overflowing with numerous old vehicles. This is why it is quite common for cars to break down in the middle of the road, amongst other similar incidents. In addition to that, Venezuela is known for being one of the most dangerous countries in the world, which makes driving there quite unsafe.

Rwanda

Approximately 70 percent of the accidents that occurred in Rwanda in 2016 involved cyclists, motorcyclists, and pedestrians. In lines with the World Health Organization, the fatality rate in Rwanda is of 32.1 deaths per 100,000 people.

It appears that motorcyclists cause a significant part of the accidents, as they ignore pedestrian crossings, not to mention that they drive under the influence in dangerous, crowded locations. This is why the local authorities have introduced new, stricter penalties for traffic offenses.

India

India has the fastest growing economy at the time being – which led to a notable increase in the number of cars owned by Indian people. Nevertheless, the condition of the roads is poor, which is a primary factor that causes traffic accidents. To be more specific, in 2016, there were over 480,652 traffic accidents, which led to the death of 150,000 people. This is what makes India one of the countries with the worst drivers.

Tanzania

In spite of the local law enforcement’s efforts to diminish the incidence of road accidents, the number of deaths due to car crashes is notable. In 2016 alone there were 5,219 road accidents. According to World Health Organization figures, there are 32.9 deaths per 100,000 people on the roads of Tanzania every year. Hence, the authorities have started to charge people with traffic offenses, which, hopefully, will address this problem.

Central African Republic

Central African Republic has gone through military conflict and civil war, which significantly harmed the country’s road system, as well as the majority of public systems. Unfortunately, the infrastructure in this country has been neglected. This combined with the reckless attitude regarding road safety resulted in 1500 fatalities in 2016 alone. This equals 32.4 deaths per 100,000 people.

To conclude, traffic safety is often taken for granted – especially in developing countries. It appears that the poor condition of the infrastructure is a contributing factor. Aside from that, age is related, as younger drivers tend to be more reckless on the road – particularly when it comes to driving under the influence.

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